Welcome to My New Hood

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It’s been a little over half a year since we moved from our tiny urban condo to our slightly bigger medium-sized urban house in Cambridge.

I am amazed at how time has flown. It seems like just yesterday we were packing endless boxes, throwing out all sorts of junk, and dealing with the move.

Though we aren’t completely settled yet, we’ve made significant progress. About 95% of the boxes are unpacked, 85% of necessary furniture purchased, and 0% of the home decorating has been done (OK, I guess I did hang up one print . . .)

In honor of the half-year anniversary of our new house, I’ve decided to dedicate this next series to highlighting some of the new restaurants we’ve discovered in our “hood.”

We essentially ate our way up Mass Ave from Harvard to Porter, and then visited several other nearby places, all within walking distance.

Here’s a sneak preview of the places we visited!

French style bistro with a nicer-than-average selection of tasty vegetarian options.
This French/Cuban restaurant has been around for decades and boasts the city’s best Cubano sandwich. Sashimi
The sushi and sashimi at this third outpost of a popular Brookline joint is so large that you really should order half the amount of sushi you usually get!
Solidly executed food, reasonable prices, and a nice vibe make this one of the most popular gastropubs on the stretch between Harvard Square and Porter Square.
Hi Rise Bakery Breads
One of my favorite bakeries, I was thrilled when it moved that much closer to me. Now it’s really less than a 5-minute walk away to excellent pastries, my favorite vanilla loaf in the world, and delicious sandwiches.
Garlic Semolina Soup
Our new favorite hangout – excellent food, cozy atmosphere, a constantly changing menu, and an all-around great chef draws us back over and over again.

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Latest New York eats!

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Comments

  1. Elise Ramsay says

    Oo, I can’t wait for this! I live in Davis Square and haven’t checked out many of the places on that stretch yet. Congrats on the move from a big fan of your blog!

  2. says

    i recognize all of those places! glad you’re having a good time in your new hood! ever try thai food from rod dee past porter?  really yum!

  3. says

    Congratulations
    on your new condo! Moving may take some time but once you’re done with all the unpacking
    and stuff, you’ll feel this huge relief and realize everything’s worth it. Heh.
    That’s actually what I felt when I first moved to my condo. :)

  4. says

    The Cuban sandwich reminds me of one of my Grandma’s most delicious breakfast recipes – a family delicacy which she has yet to share to us after all these years. hehe Well, packing should be done at least six weeks before the move date, and it should be planned carefully. If you can organize the move to take place on a date that you are sure to encounter less traffic, then that would be better.

  5. says

    First and Foremost you’d need to create a shortlist of all the kitchen hoods that fit within your stipulated budget and at the same time it should possess all the features that you’re looking for. This will reduce your list drastically and you’ll be left with a shorter list of kitchen hoods that somewhat match your requirements.

  6. says

    Now what really happens is this, hood cleaning companies are in business to make money. That being said if they have a customer or are giving an estimate to a potential customer. They happen to notice an issue that is not in compliance with the codes. As soon as they put a sticker on your hood the technician who is licensed and signs that sticker becomes liable for that issue if it catches fire. Furthermore if some one else came in for any reason and they reported it the technician is in big trouble they can lose their license or a number of other bad things can happen.

  7. says

    Today it is a different world out there in this business than it was 20 years ago. Now the regulations are real, they are enforced on both the hood cleaner and the restaurant owner. The NFPA wants the fire hazards gone. They want the problems to be history. This is a good goal but the smaller restaurants took a hit in this whole thing some restaurants have issues with the codes yet the systems are still able to be cleaned properly. So in a circumstance like this, what happens?

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